Attachment Theory

Children are born with a predisposition to bond physically and emotionally to parents...generally referred to in research literature  as 'attachment theory'.  As Dr Dan Siegel stated 'relationships that are connecting, and allow for collaboration appear to offer children with a wealth of interpersonal closeness that supports the development of many domains, including social, emotional and cognitive functioning'.  (Siegel, 2001; pg.78).

The 'Puzzle Of Us' uses the following four therapeutic concepts derived from Attachment Theory.  Within its poetic versus and magical illustrations , this is a story that gently guides, and teaches these concepts.  

Share in Joy

 

Shared moments of enjoyment provide children with a sense that the
caregiver is attentive, available and attuned.  It also makes children feel they are worthy of such attention.


 'At all times, children need to know that no matter what they are doing, their parent finds delight in them' (Cooper, Hoffman, Marvin, and Powell, 2004).

 

Moments of connection that work towards building  a well-engrained sense of self worth in the child.
 

Mindful Attention

Applied research recognises that parents often are consumed by demands other than providing attention to their children.  Experts suggest parents devote at least four twenty minute periods of undivided attention to their children a day (Brazelton, T. Berry M.D. and Greenspan, Stanley, M.D, 2000; p.41).

Applied research recognises that parents often are consumed by demands other than providing attention to their children.  Experts suggest parents devote at least four twenty minute periods of undivided attention to their children a day (Brazelton, T. Berry M.D. and Greenspan, Stanley, M.D, 2000; p.41).

Play

Play is the primary way children learn.  'Playful Parenting' as described by Cohen (2001. P.2) as ' a way to enter the child's world on the child's terms'.  And this fosters closeness, confidence and connection.  

Applied research recognises that parents often are consumed by demands other than providing attention to their children.  Experts suggest parents devote at least four twenty minute periods of undivided attention to their children a day (Brazelton, T. Berry M.D. and Greenspan, Stanley, M.D, 2000; p.41).

Comfort

Responding to your child with warmth and acceptance in times of big emotion helps to foster emotional resilience.  'Letting your child know that you understand it's hard for them, is the kindest and most helpful thing you can do for them in that moment' (Siegel, 2001; p.190).

Applied research recognises that parents often are consumed by demands other than providing attention to their children.  Experts suggest parents devote at least four twenty minute periods of undivided attention to their children a day (Brazelton, T. Berry M.D. and Greenspan, Stanley, M.D, 2000; p.41).

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